Tag Archives: colleen lindsay

What is a Mere Book? Twitter Conversation #6

16 May
For this week’s twitter conversation, I’m going to take a statement made by @ColleenLindsay, former agent and bookish bon vivant, in a brief about books vs. content.  Warning: I go far beyond any implications the original context would justify.
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ColleenLindsayI’m not sentimental about books as objects; I’m only sentimental about the content contained in those books. #sosueme

johnandrewhall@ColleenLindsay Well the content of a book is its object. Anycase what about something like this … http://twitpic.com/4y4xkv

ColleenLindsay@johnandrewhall Illuminated manuscripts are a work of art and a piece of history; not just mere books.


So, as you may have guessed from the title, Colleen’s last statement got me wondering: what is a mere book?  Is the content in a book equally transferable to all forms, or “containers”? Is an eBook intrinsically less satisfying because of it’s digital format: can it present a more fulfilling experience than it’s printed counterpart? Is the printed book, in it’s tree consuming, space eating, wrist strain inducing form, ever preferable over electronic books?

First, I have to admit, I’m a bit of a paper fetishist.  Which is ironic, as I make my living marketing books, both “p” and “e”, almost exclusively via an online, digital platform.

That said, I think many books have little relationship to their format… a beach book, whether romance or thriller, will seldom be kept or remembered for the paper it’s printed on, and is more likely to be find it’s way to a garage sale bin than onto a book shelf.

Similarly, many eBooks, produced as a series of static, .pdf like pages, are not creating a unique digital experience.

These sorts of books, their formats and the marriage of the two is once of convenience and availability, determined by the tastes and access of the reader.

But while the illustrated manuscript is indeed historical and a work of art, it must be noted that when it was produced, it was a just a book… all books were to some degree artful, as they were copies, illustrated and bound by hand.  None were historical when they were originally read.  That perspective only comes with the passing of decades and, in the case of illustrated manuscripts, centuries.

But it’s true, you can’t have the same experience of this book digitally, even in the best electronic simulation.

Conversely, Alice for the iPad provides is a unique experience, with no corollary to a standard print book, no matter how well illustrated, no matter what quality the paper, or beauty of the binding.  An enhanced cookbook with video demonstrations will provide a different experience than the most beautifully photographed print version.

We’ve all seen movies that didn’t provide anything close to the books they were adapted from, and some excellent movies have become mediocre books.  I make this point because there are many sorts of media, and while certain content may be duplicated in both print and digital, they are different media, have different strengths and weaknesses, as with film, audio, television, digital and print.

None is necessarily superior, though for specific projects, they may provide a uniquely superior containers for their specific content.

Content, and the experience of its consumer, changes with the format in which it is expressed.
While I agree that content and form are not the same thing, I have observed that when a concept is artfully explored, content and from can be inextricably melded to produce a format specific experience that could not be duplicated in other media.

What do you think?  Do you have examples of media/platform specific narratives?

Let me know…